Notes on Ciccariello-Maher’s ‘So Much the Worse for Whites’

If the face is in fact Christ, in other words, your average ordinary White Man, then the first deviances, the first divergence-types, are racial: yellow man, black man, men in the second or third category…They must be Christianized, in other words, facialized. European racism as the white man’s claim…operates by the determination of degrees of … Continue reading Notes on Ciccariello-Maher’s ‘So Much the Worse for Whites’

Advertisements

From a Philosophically Clean-Shaven Marx to a Philosophically Decolonized Deleuze

A desperately rough sketch of the third chapter of my dissertation If the face is in fact Christ, in other words, your average ordinary White Man, then the first deviances, the first divergence-types, are racial: yellow man, black man, men in the second or third category…They must be Christianized, in other words, facialized. European racism … Continue reading From a Philosophically Clean-Shaven Marx to a Philosophically Decolonized Deleuze

‘5 Theses on the Politics of Cruelty’ – Hostis: A Journal of Incivility

(A preview from the forthcoming Issue of Hostis: A Journal of Incivility) I). The politics that seduces us is not ethical, it is cruel. We contrast the politics of cruelty to the politics of ethics. Ethics goes all the way back to the Greeks, whose ethics was the study of ‘the good life.’ Our interests … Continue reading ‘5 Theses on the Politics of Cruelty’ – Hostis: A Journal of Incivility

No Dialogue Is Possible: Badiou, Vergès, and the Question of Rupture

(This post is a continuation of some previous thoughts on Badiou's essay 'The Three Negations,' which can be found here) Perhaps one of Alain Badiou's strongest allies in his articulation of the Event is an anachronistic one. Jacques Vergès, French-Vietnamese lawyer, was made famous by his defense of Djamila Bouhired, Algerian nationalist and fighter in the National … Continue reading No Dialogue Is Possible: Badiou, Vergès, and the Question of Rupture

A Rupture in Colonial Reason: Spivak, Fanon, and The Question of Subalternity

This is an abridged draft for the upcoming ACLA conference in NYC in the Spring of 2014 I. Memories of a Spivakian Given her revisions in A Critique of Postcolonial Reason, Spivak delineates three main point regarding the subaltern. First, the subaltern refers to the space of “sheer heterogeneity of” decolonization. Second, “when a line … Continue reading A Rupture in Colonial Reason: Spivak, Fanon, and The Question of Subalternity